Reflexology - Harley Street London

Reflexology

£40.00

Western reflexology has its roots in ancient traditions from China and Egypt and in western neurology. Peter has worked with many conditions and adds Chinese acupressure points in the feet which he finds compliments and enriches treatments.

Benefits at a glance:

  • Treats the whole body-mind
  • Profoundly relaxing
  • Energising
  • Great for digestive problems
  • For those who cannot tolerate bodywork
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Therapy Description

Western reflexology has its roots in ancient traditions from China and Egypt and in western neurology. Peter has worked with many conditions and adds Chinese acupressure points in the feet which he finds compliments and enriches treatments.

Reflexology, the application of finger pressure upon the soles of the feet in a systematic protocol has roots in ancient China and Egypt, where papyrus scrolls show foot treatments. In truth, the science behind how reflexology works is still little understood.  Neurologically, it may be that nerve pathways which are distal to the main nerve roots send signals to influence the whole body and yet, this only works for one part of the anatomy. In TCM theory, it is possible that acupressure points in the feet, of which there are many very important ones, could influence meridians like the Kidney, Spleen and Liver as these meridians start in the feet.  These could, then, influence the rest of the body.  Modern western anatomists creating the current upsurge in the study of fascia, might state it is clear that the foot or plantar fascia can be dissected in one continuity up the back line of the body, over the scalp ending at the eyebrows! It is a truism to say everything is connected, but it evidently is.

Peter integrates knowledge of acupressure points into western reflexology to provide treatments which are bespoke for individual needs.  He treats anything from back pain, post cancer care, IBS, stress, anxiety, depression, palliative care and many more. There are contraindications to practice including some types of peripheral neuropathy, the diabetic foot, advanced Raynauds Syndrome, women in the first trimester of Pregnancy.

If you have any questions about this therapy and its suitability for your situation please contact Peter

Grealish, L., Lomasney, A., & Whiteman, B. (2000). Foot massage. A nursing intervention to modify the distressing symptoms of pain and nausea in patients hospitalized with cancer. Cancer Nursing, 23, 237-243.

RESULTS: In a sample of 87 subjects, a 10-minute foot massage (5 minutes per foot) was found to reduce perceptions of pain, nausea, and relaxation when measured with a visual analog scale.


Wang, H.L., & Keck, J.F. (2004). Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain. Pain Management Nursing, 5, 59-65.

RESULTS: Participants reported decreases in pain intensity. Decreases in sympathetic responses to pain (i.e., heart rate and respiratory rate) were observed although blood pressure remained unchanged. The patients experienced moderate pain after they received pain medications.

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